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Saturday, November 03, 2007

Comments

Anita

I think there's a tangential relationship to "field to fork" -- it does strongly imply local-ness. As in the food coming from farms located in our (metaphorical) back yards.

It's a bit precious for my taste, though. And yes, I think you're right to worry about people thinking it's a burger and ribs place... that's what I make in -my- back yard. :) It kind of mirrors Front Porch.

Jack

Awful name. (Right to the point I am.)

jen maiser

I agree with Anita's implication of localness, but it's not my favorite name in general. Too cutesy.

Melissa

I still love Olallie the best. I don't have any other suggestions, though I've been trying to think about your name game.

My 2 cents is that since this is your personal project, so personal it is a true extension of yourself and is/will be your daily life, it is hard for other people to give it a name.

While Olallie doesn't connotate Spanish food, it has a sweet rhythm to it, special meaning for you, is quirky enough to remember and people have already been associating your future restaurant with the name. Yes, it may get mispelled and mispoken, but people do that with my common first name all the time. Eh, not a big deal. As long as they can find you!

Hearth would have been a good one, but you said it is not possible. On the other hand, there's already Range, Home, Manor, and Casa this and Chez that.

Viva Olallie!

Erin

I like it alright - I think it's cute and when you find out what it stands for, you get a little chuckle and a "huh, that's cool." If you've got a backyard and that's a big selling point for you (since it seems rather rare, from your commentary), play it up! Love the lowercase, too...

Anita

I've been digging in the Catalan dictionary again:
- urbà (city)
- masia (another 'farmhouse' variation)
- ganivet (knife)
- àpat (meal)
- cassola (pot/pan)
- mercat (market -- I think this is a duplicate, but I can't seem to find it in previous comments)

Morton the Mousse

I don't like the frame of reference in this one. When I think of NIMBYs I think of nuclear power plants, landfills, prisons, and slaughterhouses. I know the whole purpose is to contrast with NIMBY, but people will still naturally think of NIMBYs and all of the negative associations that come with that word.

Ee.

Here, here, Melissa! I think Olallie is still the most solid choice. It represents the local, field to fork idea and it won't tie you down to a spanish influenced menu.

I also think it's a name of a restaurant that will stick around. Many of the other names seemed a little too trendy.

Anita D

I think it's fun! And, I also think it's a little too diner-y. Frankly, no name is perfect.

With Olallie, people might expect you to have that jam or pie always on the menu. With imby, they might expect you to always have a burger on the menu... yum... burger... where was I? Oh yeah, I think the reality is that you might always dash what expectations people might walk in with, but they will walk out having had an incredible dining experience... they won't remember or care about having had their expectations dashed! And, the next time they walk in (which I am positively sure that they will) their expectations will be just right.

So, the question remains, do you name your restaurant based solely on first impressions (yes, you need to lure them in)?

And, it's true, I still have no wonderful Catalan ideas... or any other ideas for that matter. I guess I'm pretty bad at this.

art

sounds like Quimby and looks like it is missing a prefix.

I hope the city fixes that sidewalk!

Another suggestion...

Ken H

After my initial "huh?", the explanation put a smile on my face. That said, I think it's a little to kitschy for your restaurant.

Bonnie

[catching up late in the name game]

Hmmm. Imby sounds too informal, and like it should have a cartoon mascot. Catalina is too generic. I like Bocarte the best so far -- so what if some people Humphreyize it? It resonates, at least for me, whether you know the etymology or not.

I also like Ollalie because it is unique, but there is something very feminine about it — which you shouldn't mind since you're such a girly chef, right? ;-)

sam

this one sucks! imby of nimby which is almost namby which goes with pamby

Tracy

imby-cilic? Don't care for it, I have to say.

Diane

Imby? Gumby?
mmmmmm.........no.

Rachel

I think that a Catalan word that captures the farm-table/backyard essence would be best. With an obvious preference for pronunciation ease.

Tuala: Table

Adele

My initial reaction: "Huh?" Without knowing what it stands for, it sounds like a tech start-up or a consulting firm, not a restaurant.

Aaron

I disagree that it has no field to fork reference. That was actually the first thing that came to mind for me...that your ingredients would be from your back yard. In any case this isn't a front-runner for me, but I just thought I'd mention that.

Chilebrown

Might as well name it Gumby and have a Pokey Special for an appetizer.

Chilebrown

Might as well name it Gumby and have a Pokey Special for an appetizer.

I-Chant

It's too cutesy. I think the others are right about the other connotations this name will invoke: quimby, gumby, nimby. It's not as interesting and it doesn't say a lot about your cooking. You've got better names in the running.

EB

I stood in front of well...your storefront this morning munching my Holey Bagel and I pondered, pondered, pondered. Truth be told... the 80* heat fried my San Francisco weather acclimated brain... and nothing AHA! worthy sprouted. I'm still workin' on it.

Amy Sherman

Please, tell me you are kidding...

Anita

I think I still like Olallie the best. I like the backstories and connotations for many of the other names, but I'm not sure I would get them right away and without knowing the in-jokes, I would say Olallie just sounds the best.

rachel

I love the meaning, but maybe agree with the too cuteness problem.

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